Examples of contemporary ethnicity based jury nullification

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Examples of contemporary ethnicity based jury nullification

Posted on April 27, by Scott Alexander I. I read it anyway on the advice of people who kept telling me it explains everything about America. And it sort of does. Different parts of the country were settled by very different groups of Englishmen with different regional backgrounds, religions, social classes, and philosophies.

The colonization process essentially extracted a single stratum of English society, isolated it from all the others, and then plunked it down on its own somewhere in the Eastern US.

I used to play Alpha Centauri, a computer game about the colonization of its namesake star system. One of the dynamics that made it so interesting was its backstory, where a Puerto Rican survivalist, an African plutocrat, and other colorful characters organized their own colonial expeditions and competed to seize territory and resources.

You got to explore not only the settlement of a new world, but the settlement of a new world by societies dominated by extreme founder effects. What kind of weird pathologies and wonderful innovations do you get when a group of overly romantic Scottish environmentalists is allowed to develop on its own trajectory free of all non-overly-romantic-Scottish-environmentalist influences?

Fischer describes four of these migrations: The Puritans I hear about these people every Thanksgiving, then never think about them again for the next days.

They were a Calvinist sect that dissented against the Church of England and followed their own brand of dour, industrious, fun-hating Christianity. Most of them were from East Anglia, the part of England just northeast of London. I knew about the Mayflower, I knew about the black hats and silly shoes, I even knew about the time Squanto threatened to release a bioweapon buried under Plymouth Rock that would bring about the apocalypse.

Much like eg Unitarians today, the Puritans were a religious group that drew disproportionately from the most educated and education-obsessed parts of the English populace. Literacy among immigrants to Massachusetts was twice as high as the English average, and in an age when the vast majority of Europeans were farmers most immigrants to Massachusetts were skilled craftsmen or scholars.

The Puritans tried to import African slaves, but they all died of the cold. The average family size in Waltham, Massachusetts in the s was 9. Everyone was compelled by law to live in families. Town officials would search the town for single people and, if found, order them to join a family; if they refused, they were sent to jail.

Some Puritans took pride in their learning by giving their children obscure Biblical names they would expect nobody else to have heard of, like Mahershalalhasbaz. Still others chose Biblical words completely at random and named their children things like Maybe or Notwithstanding.

Along with the famous scarlet A for adultery, Puritans could be forced to wear a B for blasphemy, C for counterfeiting, D for drunkenness, and so on. Wasting time in Massachusetts was literally a criminal offense, listed in the law code, and several people were in fact prosecuted for it.

Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote of Massachusetts Puritanism: A typical Massachusetts week would begin in the church, which doubled as the town meeting hall.

There were no decorations except a giant staring eye on the pulpit to remind churchgoers that God was watching them. Townspeople would stand up before their and declare their shame and misdeeds, sometimes being forced to literally crawl before the other worshippers begging for forgiveness.

THen the minister would give two two-hour sermons back to back. The entire affair would take up to six hours, and the church was unheated for some reason they stored all their gunpowder there, so no one was allowed to light a fireand this was Massachusetts, and it was colder in those days than it is now, so that during winter some people would literally lose fingers to frostbite Fischer:I.

Albion’s Seed by David Fischer is a history professor’s nine-hundred-page treatise on patterns of early immigration to the Eastern United States. It’s not light reading and not the sort of thing I would normally pick up. I read it anyway on the advice of people who kept telling me it explains everything about America.

Mar 26,  · A sieve. When we look around we see lots of rocks (from planets and all the way down to sand and gravel), because rocks tend to stick around.

Same with humans – through some quirk of natural laws, we’re right now, in this context, a rather stable form of matter. On the other hand, practicing ethnicity-based jury nullification may increase or damage further the racial relations which have been existing in our country.

(Clapp, ). Widening the ethnic relation rift can lead to various moral implications and increase racial discrimination.

Include contemporary examples of ethnicity-based jury nullification. Jury nullification, of course, is a time-tested practice that goes back to before the American Declaration of Independence. Essentially, it occurs when members of a jury decide to free somebody even though prosecutors prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the accused did indeed violate a criminal statute.

Examples of contemporary ethnicity based jury nullification

As a follow-up to Tuesday’s post about the majority-minority public schools in Oslo, the following brief account reports the latest statistics on the cultural enrichment of schools in Austria.

Vienna is the most fully enriched location, and seems to be in roughly the same situation as Oslo. Many thanks to Hermes for the translation from timberdesignmag.com based jury nullification, while Dixon’s trial was perceived as a rejection of that practice.

Examples of contemporary ethnicity based jury nullification

Part II outlines the history of jury nullification. Part III provides a brief description of The Wire. Part IV examines the fictional trial of Senator Clay Davis and the real-life trial of Sheila Dixon, and the reasons for their disparate results.

New Hampshire Jury Nullifies Major Felony Marijuana Case